Twisted cabin architecture for home on the ski slopes of Norway

By Kim McFayden 5 years ago
Twisted cabin architecture for home on the ski slopes of Norway

The ‘Twisted cabin’ is in the mountains of Kvitfjell in Norway and was designed as a ski cabin by architects Jarmund/Vigsnæs AS Arkitekter MNALis. The site is 1000m above sea level and has direct ski in, ski out access. In the words of the architects: “The volume of the cabin reflects the contours in the terrain that makes up for the seven indoor floor levels that are connected differently to the surrounding terrain. These levels give various internal and external views. The outside terraces around the cabin make it possible to always have access to sunlight. The client’s brief was to make a leisure house that could accommodate beds for 12 persons, but at the same time be intimate for only 2 people. On the primary floor it’s possible to close off the secondary rooms/functions with large sliding doors in each end of the main living room. The integrated “guest” part facing east of the cabin has its own kitchen and bedrooms and bathrooms, and more intimate closed off loft and living rooms. The master bedroom is placed in the west end of the cabin. The garage is integrated with internal access to the cabin. The central staircase has a light sculptural shaft. The interior ceilings and walls are clad with oak, with exception of some concrete walls. Corten steel has been used over the fireplaces. The flooring uses local slate and oak. The facades and roof are clad in larch wood. The gutter is hidden behind the cladding. The widows have oak frames.”

[photography by Nils Petter Dale]

Categories:
  ARCHITECTURE, elements, materials, metal, minimalist, sustainable design, timber
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 Kim McFayden

  (247 articles)

Founder and editor of Designhunter

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